Civil Society Case Study: Business and Human Rights Resource Centre

"As a free, public registry, the OAR has become a vital tool for corporate transparency and accountability, for us, and partners."

BHRRC quickly responds to worker dismissals and unpaid wages

Case 1:

In early 2019, OAR data enabled the BHRRC to quickly respond to the dismissal of over 1,000 garment workers for striking over the non-payment of benefits in Cambodia.

BHRRC was able to swiftly use the OAR to identify brands sourcing from the factory and ask for their response and plan of action. Two brands responded and launched investigations. Through pressure from many quarters, including brand interventions, the majority of workers were reinstated.

“Obviously much more is needed to be done in terms of severance and recruitment fees but even these impacts that have been achieved so far would not have been possible without the OAR!”

Case 2:

In August 2019, the BHRRC used the OAR to trace back to brands after a factory closure in Mauritius. The closure had left Bangladeshi migrant workers stranded and owed unpaid wages.

After reaching out to the brands, BHRRC was able to work with a major brand sourcing from the factory and a local trade union to ensure remedial steps were taken (backwages, re-employment for some, repatriation talks with the Mauritian government, re-installation of water and power lines etc).

“As a free, public registry, the OAR has become a vital tool for corporate transparency and accountability, for us, and partners. It brings immediate benefits to our work. For instance, we use the OAR to track back the abuse reported to us in apparel factories to ensure brands are informed of violations in their supply chains, and to seek accountability – due diligence to end abuse, and remedy for those harmed.

We see enormous gains for the entire industry. Human rights advocates inside companies, civil society, investors, and governments can use it to help drive the change needed to achieve sustainability and respect for human rights throughout apparel supply chains.”

Phil Bloomer Executive Director, Business and Human Rights Resource Centre

Image shows the logo of Business & Human Rights Resource Centre.

The BHRRC is a global non-profit organization dedicated to advancing human rights in business and eradicating abuse. It helps communities and NGOs get companies to address human rights concerns, and provides companies an opportunity to present their response in full. It also tracks the human rights policy and performance of more than 9,000 companies in over 180 countries, making information publicly available. It engages with companies and governments to urge them to share information publicly.